• Transition from static JSP templates with jQuery plugins and Angular.js directives to isomorphic React components
  • Rewrite of the complete stylesheet and markup code due to rebranding, using LESS, BEM and atomic design
  • Daily tasks including CSS animations, code maintenance and learning Swedish
  • Link
  • Webdesign for the social startup
  • New web app from scratch using Ember.js, LESS and JavaScript ES6
  • Link (Company has undergone a major rebranding and replaced the site since)
  • Thesis about using typography to present interpretations of a text
  • Freelance website project for a non-profit organisation
  • Internship in Turku, Finland as editorial designer
  • Head of the politics division in students' union
  • Founded and edited a campus newspaper
  • Internship at a publishing house
  • Focus on audiovisual technology, signals, math and physics
  • Practical application in recording own music

The web has been around for a while and has become an essential part of all of our lifes. Now it even spans into the real world with the Internet of Things. But the internet is still just a tool.

While there are so many new startups every week it seems that most of them are developing things to make developing things easier. This is a healthy sign of progress, but I ask myself why there are so few that use the web to make the real world a better and safer place for all of us.

One of the best parts of working in a team is being able to learn from your co-workers, both on a professional and personal level. I think it is important that a team consists of a good mix of people – not just the "world's best" developers.

When people from different backgrounds come together in a team they are more likely to teach and learn from each other and it often leads to more creative and well thought-out solutions.

When learning a language or trying to adapt in a foreign country, Empathy is a very useful helper. While observing and understanding the behaviour of others rather than just talking and doing yourself you'll learn on a much deeper level.

The same thing applies when learning programming. Rather than just writing ahead, I like to take a step back and see how others are doing it. How are they organising their codebase? Why are they writing it that way? That way I found myself asking the same questions about my own codebase and improving its quality.

One of the most underrated power-ups in workplace relations ist trust. A superior following every step and waiting for you to finish something just so that they can scan through it and find its flaws is actively damaging the workplace and productivity.

People who are trusted by their superiors will be much more likely to prove them right. When I feel trusted I want to honor that trust and am willing to put in extra effort to deliver great work.